360° Photography

Click on the links to view

Use your mouse to control the direction and experience a 360° view of selected York Conservation Trust properties.

HO: 92 Micklegate, York YO1 6JX +44 (0) 1904 651 880Telephone:
+44 (0) 1904 627 205Fax:
info@yorkconservationtrust.orgE-mail:

Timeline

1300 - 1399

60 Goodramgate (1317)

12 Newgate (1337)

 

1400 - 1499

Bowes Morrell House, 111 Walmgate (1400)

St. Anthony’s Hall, Peasholme Green (1446)

 

1500 - 1599

85-87-89 Micklegate

77 Walmgate

Sir Thomas Herbert’s House, Pavement (1545)

5 Colliergate (late 1500)

35-41 North Street (late 1500)

43 Goodramgate (late 1500/early 1600)

45 Goodramgate (late 1500/early 1600)

49 Goodramgate (late 1500/early 1600)

51 Goodramgate (late 1500/early 1600)

56 Low Petergate (late 1500/early 1600)

 

1600 - 1699

15-16 Fossgate (1600)

4 Jubbergate (1600)

7A Tanner Row (1600)

Ingram House, Bootham (1635)

Lady Peckett’s Yard, Pavement (1650)

 

1700 - 1799

12-16 Stonegate

The Red House, Duncombe Place (1714)

13-14 Fossgate (1720)

38 Monkgate (1723)

29-31 St. Saviourgate (1735)

Assembly Rooms, Blake Street (1735)

14 St. Saviour’s Place (1750)

17 Walmgate (1750)

Wesley Chapel, 62 Aldwark(1759)

27 St. Saviourgate (1763)

6 Walmgate (late 1700)

8/8A Walmgate (late 1700)

 
1800 - 1899

83 Micklegate (1800)

Morrell Yard, Fossgate (1800/1998)

11 St. Saviour’s Place (1800)

12-13 St. Saviour’s Place (1800)

De Grey House, St. Leonard’s Place (1835)

54 Bootham (1840)

De Grey Rooms, St. Leonard’s Place (1841-1842)

Bootham Lodge, 56 Bootham (1840-1845)

Wesley Chapel, 64 Aldwark(1850)

13 Walmgate (1850)

15 Walmgate (1850)

66 Bootham (1852-1860)

Cuthbert Morrell House, 47 Aldwark(late 1800/early 1900)

4 Walmgate (1875)

8 Colliergate (late 1800)

61 Micklegate (late 1800)

34 Gillygate (late 1800/early 1900)

36 Gillygate (late 1800/early 1900)

 
Unknown date

5-6 & 7 Malt Shovel Court

Powell’s Yard, Goodramgate

3-5 Tanner Row

Epoch

The Middle Ages 1216 - 1347

During the thirteenth century, England and Scotland developed clearer self-identities. In England’s case, this was as a result of the loss of most of her continental possessions which focused the monarchy’s attention closer to home.

 

Late Medieval 1348 - 1484

First outbreak of the Black Death (bubonic plague) 1348

In 1348, the bubonic plague which had been sweeping across Europe arrived in Britain through the southern coast ports. Known as the Black Death, the disease was spread by fleas living in the fur of rats and attacked a population already weakened by a series of famines.

 

Tudors 1485 - 1602

Henry Tudor crowned 1485, in January 1486, Henry VII married Elizabeth of York, the daughter of Edward IV, helping to unify the two factions of York and Lancaster.

 

Stuarts 1603 - 1713

England was to be a republic until the collapse of Cromwell’s Commonwealth and the restoration of Charles II in 1660. Shortly afterwards, a devastating plague swept through the country followed by the Great Fire of London.

Compromise between the crown and Parliament finally achieved a balanced government and the two kingdoms of England and Scotland became joined in the 1707 Act of Union.

 

Georgians 1714 - 1836

The Georgian period was a one of change. There was a new dynasty on the throne and, before long, the very infrastructure of Britain was changing. Agricultural developments were followed by industrial innovation and this, in turn, led to urbanisation and the need for better communications. Britain became the world’s first modern society.

 

Victorians 1837 - 1900

During Victoria’s reign, the revolution in industrial practices continued to change British life. With it came increased urbanisation and a burgeoning communications network.

 

Early 20th Century 1901 - 1944

In medicine, one of the major advances of this period was penicillin, discovered to kill bacteria by Alexander Fleming in 1928 and isolated for clinical use during the Second World War.

Text extracted from the BBC website.

If you want to know more about british history please visit the link below:

www.bbc.co.uk/history

 
One of York’s many claims to fame The National Railway Museum in York has been voted best European Museum 2001, with the largest railway collection in the world.